Steve Phillips’ Public Walk of Shame

October 23, 2009
Steve Phillips had an affair with this dog over the summer.  Now shes telling the world.

Steve Phillips had an affair with this dog over the summer. Now she's telling the world.

To quote Macaulay Culkin’s character in the masterpiece Home Alone, “Buzz! Your girlfriend! Woof!”  And that may even be an understatement of epic proportions to refer to the mistress in the Steve Phillips affair saga.

For those of you unfamiliar with the situation, here’s the drama:  Steve Phillips had a relationship with a 22-year production assistant at ESPN this past summer.  Brooke Hundley, the mistress, apparently thought the relationship was much more serious than it turned out to be and wound up giving a letter detailing their sordid affair to Phillips’ wife.  Allegedly, Hundley sat in the driveway of Phillips’ family home in Wilton, CT and waited for the wife to get home to deliver the letter in person.  But when the wife came home, Hundley panicked, got in her car, and backed out of the driveway (not before backing through a stone wall), speeding away.  The letter was left on the front door. Furthermore, Hundley stalked Phillip’s eldest son, chatting with him under a fake name on instant messager, friending him with a fake profile on Facebook, and trying to glean family information from the boy.

I wouldn't bang this heffer with CareBear's dick.

I wouldn't bang this heffer with CareBear's dick.

Steve Phillips admitted to the affair earlier this week, and is currently trying to protect his family from this “delusional and obsessive” individual.  He is also on a “leave of absence” from ESPN while he deals with this issue, although it is widely believed he is suspended and eventually will be fired for his transgressions, following in the steps of another former Baseball Tonight analyst, Harold Reynolds.  Sadly, this isn’t the first affair Phillips has been engaged in.  In 1998, he was forced to admit to several affairs after being accused of sexual harassment while with the Mets.  He settled that case out of court.  It has also been reported that his wife has filed for divorce, immediately after this story broke.

Hundley is a graduate from Ithaca College with a degree in TV/Radio.  She’s certainly got the face for radio.  In her letter, she reported in graphic detail some of the things her and Phillips engaged in.  Some of the gems:

  • She’s “not just some random girl he had sex with in parking lots.
  • They “first slept together in St. Louis in his hotel suite.
  • They apparently went without a condom, because Steve “assured me I wouldn’t have to worry about getting pregnant since his vasectomy.”
  • They exchanged texts “mostly about the sexual side of our relationship.”  She even has “some saved if you ever want to read them.”
  • “He’s glad you decided to stay at home, he enjoys being with me because I have more of a passion and drive to really do something with my life.”
  • And she’s “not telling you all of this to hurt you in any way”
  • “To top it off, Steve has a big birthmark on his crotch right above his penis and one on his left inner thigh, so you know i’m not being fake”
I'd rather bang the storm trooper.

I'd rather bang the storm trooper.

Miss Hundley, is a real class act.  I’m glad that she wasn’t trying to hurt Mrs Phillips by writing this; imagine what her letter would look like if she WAS trying to hurt her?  I mean, she’s got a drive to do something with her life, what does Marni Phillips bring to the table?  For a communication’s major, who told students at her alma mater that writing is one of the most important skills a professional needs, the letter looks like it could’ve been written by a pubescent teenager.

What did we learn here, other than Phillips is a serial cheater and has ruined his family’s lives in the most public way possible?  First of all, if you’re going to cheat, cheat up.  Never, ever cheat down.  It’s that simple.  Listen, Phillips isn’t a particularly talented baseball man (See here) but he’s not dirtiest old man either.  He could definitely do better than this pig.  Hot chicks don’t become obsessed with their paramour, they simply move on because they can.  Ugly girls though, they are never going to see anything this good again in their miserable lives.  They are going to hold on for dear life, it’s science.  Second, ESPN doesn’t care about illicit affairs, but they do care about them when they come to public light.  It’s widely known that Chris Berman and Mark Schlereth are among the worst offenders in Bristol.  But nobody cares because their families aren’t sent nasty letters or pressing charges.  When Harold Reynolds was sued, he was never seen on the network again.  Phillips is next.

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Steve Phillips Needs To Stop Talking

July 22, 2009
Steve Phillips is another sportscaster who just doesnt have credibility.

Steve Phillips is another sportscaster who just doesn't have credibility.

So I was just watching Baseball Tonight on ESPN, and the topic of trading for Roy Halladay came up.  Karl Ravich asks Steve Phillips his opinion on the situation.  He proceeds to say that if he was a GM in the game, he would sell the farm for Halladay.  Now I have no problem saying “I’d trade almost anything for him,” because Halladay is among the best pitchers in the majors.  But Phillips didn’t stop there.  He proceeded to name every single top young pitcher in the bigs and offered them to Toronto.

This isn’t shocking, coming from the former New York Mets GM who has a long track record of trading future stars for short-term help.   He obviously doesn’t value prospects, which is fine to an extent, because they are not guaranteed to succeed.  But he didn’t name just prospects.

Steve Phillips named the Dodgers as a team that needs to trade for Doc, offering Clayton Kershaw and others for the Blue Jay’s star.  Another team Phillips feels should trade for Halladay is the Phillies, offering every prospect in their system.  He even said that the Yankees should give Toronto, a division rival, anything they wanted including Phillip Hughes and Joba Chamberlain.  He went as far as saying, “if I was the Yankees, I’d pack his bags and drive Joba to the airport.”

My problem with his thinking is that its not practical, and it perfectly showcases the reason he’s the former GM of the Mets.  Consider his Dodgers proposal: trading 21-year old lefty Clayton Kershaw (8-5, 2.95 ERA, 104k, 1.22 WHIP) for 32-year old Halladay (11-3, 2.73, 113k, 1.07).   We’ll leave out a breakdown the “others” Phillips would give up (Tony Abreau, Blake DeWitt, James Loney, Andre Ethier, Matt Kemp to name players sure to be requested by Toronto).  Let’s just compare the pitchers that would be swapped.  What exactly do the Dodgers gain in this?  Sure, Halladay’s peripheral numbers are slightly better.  But when you consider the cost, both in terms of talent and cash, does this deal make sense?  Halladay is on the hook for the remaining of his $14m+ for this year, and $15.75m for next year, after which he’s free to go as a free agent.  Kershaw, on the other hand, is under team control for another 5 years at very cheap salaries.  Common sense tells us that Kershaw is on the upslope of his promising career, while Halladay is at the top of his game but 11 years older.  How much longer does he have before decline?  Sure, the Dodgers are World Series favorites (along with Philly) in the senior circuit, but does Halladay improve their odds in October?  He’s got the same number of October starts as Kershaw, ZERO.

As Philly is running away with the NL East, do the defending World Series Champs need Halladay?  At the cost of a starting fielder and top prospects Kyle Drabek and Jason Donald?  As is, they are on their way to a deep October run.  Do they mortgage the future hoping that Halladay wins them the title, something that nobody can guarantee?  Do the Yankees, already short on starting pitching, deal Joba and Philthy Hughes (shout out to carebear) for a pitcher with several times more wear on this tires than the two players offered for him?

When we consider Steve Phillips track record on trades of any kind, he loses all credibility.  Let’s take a look:

He traded Carl Everett (MVP candidate 2 years after being traded) for John Hudek (1-4 for the Mets). –> Lose

Sure, when he traded AJ Burnett for Al Leiter, he got 85 wins and 2 playoff appearances, including a World Series           appearance from the old guy.  But Burnett is younger and has won 95 games since then, including a World Series Title.  –> PUSH

Jason Isringhausen (283 saves since) was traded for Billy Taylor, who was 0-1 in 18 Mets appearances with an ERA over 8.0.  — > Lose

Looking for a short-term fix in 2000, Phillips nabbed Mike Bordick for 56 games and a .260 average.  Ironically, he traded a young Melvin Mora, who was hitting .260 at the time of the trade.  Unfortunately for the Mets, Mora has gone on to hit over 150 home runs with a .281 batting average over the past 10 seasons for the Orioles, including a couple of all-star appearances, a Silver Slugger award in ’04, and an MVP candidate in ’04.  Bordick left after his lone season, returning to the Orioles.  –> Lose

In ’02, Phillips gave away Gary Matthews Jr. for John Bale (who?).  ‘Nuff said.  –> Lose

Phillips traded a minor league Jason Bay for middle reliever Steve Reed.  Bay is a top corner outfielder, which is a historically weak spot for the Mets,  Steve Reed was decent but a free agent after the year.  –> Lose

Sure, he had a couple good trades (Piazza, maybe Mo Vaughn), but overall, Steve Phillips was the meth addict of baseball general managers; he traded long-term pieces for short-term fixes.  In the end, he had 2 playoff appearances to show for all of his awful trading.

So Steve, stop doling out the advice to GM’s who still have jobs in the game.  Nobody has even interviewed you for a GM position since you were canned, so perhaps they agree that you were a terrible judge of talent.  Just stop giving us your opinion on trades just because you are on ESPN.  Only talk about subjects which you have credibility with, like what kind of hair product I should use to get a ‘do like yours.